Tag: Eagles

American Bald Eagle Count Now Up to Nine for the Big Bear Valley

Big Bear Valley, CA — Twenty-seven volunteers joined U.S. Forest Service biologists at the Big Bear Discovery Center on Saturday morning, to participate in this season’s third American bald eagle count for areas that included Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake. During the one-hour count on the 13th, nine eagles were spotted in the Big Bear Valley and, of those, four were adults, and five juveniles (as indicated by their brown coloring, though juveniles are the same size as adult eagles). The San Bernardino National Forest’s February eagle count is part of the mid-winter bald eagle census, conducted since 1978 to determine the number of eagles wintering near lakes in the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountains. As of this week, a total of 15 eagles (including the nine in our area) were spotted in the San Bernardino National Forest’s survey area, which also includes Lake Arrowhead, Lake Gregory, Silverwood Lake and Lake Hemet. Eagles winter in these areas, as they are within the Pacific Migratory Flyway, bringing millions of ducks which, along with fish, are food for the eagles. If you want to observe one of the nine eagles here in the Big Bear Valley, Forest Service biologists suggest looking in the tallest trees around the lakeshore or, when the lake is partially frozen (as it is now), look for eagles perched on the ice near small groups...

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Six American Bald Eagles Now Spotted in the Big Bear Valley, Per U.S. Forest Service Count

The eagles have landed here in the Big Bear Valley—in fact, another two were spotted in the areas surrounding Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake since the U.S. Forest Service count in December. As of this weekend’s American bald eagle census count for our area, six eagles (three adults and three juveniles) were counted by biologists with the San Bernardino National Forest and 33 volunteers in the Big Bear Valley. In the overall San Bernardino National Forest count on January 9, 14 eagles were spotted in areas that include Big Bear, Lake Arrowhead, Lake Hemet and Silverwood Lake, thanks to the contributions of over 80 volunteers; the next Saturday morning count is scheduled for February 13. Eagles tend to winter in our area between November and April, and can generally be spotted in the tallest trees around the lakeshore, or perched on the lake ice near small groups of...

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Volunteers Welcome to Participate in Forest Service Eagle Count This Saturday

Those interested in enjoying the great outdoors, while also being productive, may want to join the Forest Service for this Saturday’s eagle count, which takes place both in the Baldwin Lake area and along the shoreline of Big Bear Lake. The ongoing American bald eagle census, which is now in its 31st year, included 26 volunteers in the Big Bear Valley during the December count, which amounted to four eagles spotted here, in addition to another six in surrounding lakes of the San Bernardino National Forest area, including Lake Arrowhead, Silverwood Lake and Lake Hemet. To participate in Saturday’s one-hour count at 9am, volunteers need not have experience—just bring binoculars, pen and a watch, and dress warmly. The eagle count will begin with an 8am orientation at the Big Bear Discovery Center, and volunteers can expect to be done around 10am. For more information, contact Forest Service Biologist Marc Stamer at the Big Bear Ranger Station at 382-2828. Subsequent counts will be held on February 13 and March...

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Forest Service Counts Four American Bald Eagles in the Big Bear Valley

American bald eagles winter here in the Big Bear Valley, given our location along the Pacific Migratory Flyway and the millions of ducks (which are food for the eagles), which pass through the San Bernardino mountains. In order to track the eagles, the U.S. Forest Service has conducted winter counts since 1978 and, as of this month’s one-hour eagle census in this, the program’s 31st year, four eagles were observed in the Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake areas. Of these, three were adult eagles (as indicated by the white head and tail) and one was a juvenile (given its brown head and tail); Forest Service biologists note that, for young eagles, it usually takes four to five years to acquire full adult coloration. Eagles tend to stay near Big Bear Lake and surrounding areas—including Lake Arrowhead, Lake Hemet and Silverwood Lake—through late March, before returning to summer homes in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and Alberta, Canada. If you’d like to see an American bald eagle, experts recommend looking in the tallest trees near the lakeshore and, when the lake is partially frozen (as it is now), eagles can be viewed perching on the ice near small groups of ducks using open water pockets; it is also best to limit movements and noise while watching the eagles, so biologists suggest doing so from a vehicle. Volunteers are welcome to join...

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Boat Launch Ramps Closed for Season to Allow for American Bald Eagle Habitat

December is for the birds—at least insomuch as the Municipal Water District’s boat launch ramps are concerned. As of today, December 1, and through March 31, both the Carol Morrison East Boat Launch Ramp, on the North Shore at Stanfield Cutoff, and the Duane Boyer West Boat Launch Ramp, just west of Fawnskin, on Big Bear Lake are closed to boats and vehicles, per an agreement with the U.S. Forest Service, which designates these areas as a sensitive eagle habitat. During the winter months, American Bald Eagles come to Big Bear, as lakes within the San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountains are along the Pacific Migratory Flyway for millions of ducks, which are food for the eagles. The U.S. Forest Service conducts eagle counts in the Big Bear Valley during the winter months, as they have done since 1978, and last winter season’s final count resulted in five eagles for our area. In the 1983/84 season, as many as 28 eagles were spotted in the Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake...

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