Mountain Lion Spotted in Big Bear City Neighborhood; Cat’s Behavior is Non-Aggressive

The "Keep Me Wild" link on the dfg.ca.gov website advises people not to run if approached by a mountain lion. Mountain lions tend to avoid people, as they are solitary and elusive. Residents can also trim vegetation, so there are fewer places for mountain lions to hide in and around your property; small pets and children should be supervised.

Big Bear City, CA — A Big Bear City resident spotted a mountain lion in her neighborhood, on Winding Lane near the Deadmans Curve portion of Big Bear Boulevard, on Sunday night. Per the reports received by the Big Bear Sheriffs Station and the California Department of Fish and Game, at about 10:30pm on May 16, the local woman went out to her car to retrieve her purse, and says that a mountain lion was standing there, facing her, from about an arm’s length away. Panicked by the proximity, she sprinted back toward her house and looked back to see the mountain lion trotting away from her, and across the street. The woman stumbled in her run, resulting in injuries to her face and knee. Once inside, she called 911. Big Bear Sheriff’s Station deputies responded and did an extensive check of the area, but did not see the mountain lion. The Department of Fish and Game also did a check of the area, and did find what they believe to be mountain lion tracks in the vicinity of the incident; though, a DFG official tells KBHR, the mountain lion is not considered a public safety threat at this time as it ran away from the woman and did not do anything aggressive. This is the first mountain lion sighting in this area, as earlier incidents of this month took place along the North Shore in neighborhoods that border the San Bernardino National Forest. The Department of Fish and Game continues to monitor the situation, and asks that residents who do spot mountain lions call the DFG at 909/484-0167 to report these sightings; if this direct line to the DFG goes unanswered during non-business hours, residents can also contact the Big Bear Discovery Center at 909/866-3437, or 911 in an emergency. All residents are reminded that we do live in a mountain lion habitat, and outdoor cats and small dogs are possible attractants to both mountain lions and coyotes. As for the individual who encountered the mountain lion in her neighborhood, she did seek medical attention for injuries sustained during her fall, though did not need transport from the Big Bear City Fire Department.

[caption id="attachment_7691" align="alignleft" width="225" caption="The "Keep Me Wild" link on the dfg.ca.gov website advises people not to run if approached by a mountain lion. Mountain lions tend to avoid people, as they are solitary and elusive. Residents can also trim vegetation, so there are fewer places for mountain lions to hide in and around your property; small pets and children should be supervised."][/caption]

Big Bear City, CA — A Big Bear City resident spotted a mountain lion in her neighborhood, on Winding Lane near the Deadmans Curve portion of Big Bear Boulevard, on Sunday night. Per the reports received by the Big Bear Sheriffs Station and the California Department of Fish and Game, at about 10:30pm on May 16, the local woman went out to her car to retrieve her purse, and says that a mountain lion was standing there, facing her, from about an arm’s length away. Panicked by the proximity, she sprinted back toward her house and looked back to see the mountain lion trotting away from her, and across the street. The woman stumbled in her run, resulting in injuries to her face and knee. Once inside, she called 911. Big Bear Sheriff’s Station deputies responded and did an extensive check of the area, but did not see the mountain lion. The Department of Fish and Game also did a check of the area, and did find what they believe to be mountain lion tracks in the vicinity of the incident; though, a DFG official tells KBHR, the mountain lion is not considered a public safety threat at this time as it ran away from the woman and did not do anything aggressive. This is the first mountain lion sighting in this area, as earlier incidents of this month took place along the North Shore in neighborhoods that border the San Bernardino National Forest. The Department of Fish and Game continues to monitor the situation, and asks that residents who do spot mountain lions call the DFG at 909/484-0167 to report these sightings; if this direct line to the DFG goes unanswered during non-business hours, residents can also contact the Big Bear Discovery Center at 909/866-3437, or 911 in an emergency. All residents are reminded that we do live in a mountain lion habitat, and outdoor cats and small dogs are possible attractants to both mountain lions and coyotes. As for the individual who encountered the mountain lion in her neighborhood, she did seek medical attention for injuries sustained during her fall, though did not need transport from the Big Bear City Fire Department.

Related posts:

  1. Mountain Lion Kills Small Dog in Big Bear City Neighborhood; DFG Offers Precautions for Mountain Residents
  2. Lone Jogger Followed by Mountain Lion in Lake Arrowhead Forest Area; Smaller Cat Seen in Bear City Neighborhood Again Last Night
  3. Sheriff’s Deputies Put Down Mountain Lion at Baker Pond Thursday Morning; DFG Confirms Same Animal from Last Week’s Attacks
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