Help Count Eagles and Learn More About Them This Weekend

Robin Eliason with the USFS holding a live Eagle

Big Bear, Ca, February 9, 2012, 12:00pm – The Discovery Center is once again seeking volunteers for this weekends Eagle Count on February 11th. No experience is needed, but volunteers are encouraged to dress warmly and bring binoculars and a watch.  Volunteers should meet at the Discovery Center located on North Shore Drive at 8:00am on February 11th.  In addition to the eagle counting, there will also be a celebration for the Bald Eagle at 11:00am, in which US Forest Service Biologists will host a free one hour educational Eagle presentation at the Discovery Center.  Attendees will learn about the Eagles’ migration and behavior habits, an overview of hazards that have affected Eagles throughout history, and how the Eagle has recovered from historical lows as an endangered species in the 1970’s.   Our Bald Eagles normally migrate out of the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountains in late March, heading back to summer homes in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Alberta, Canada. In recent years, a pair of Bald Eagles has remained at Lake Hemet and successfully produced several eaglets.

[caption id="attachment_27745" align="alignleft" width="145" caption="Robin Eliason with the USFS holding a live Eagle"][/caption]

Big Bear, Ca, February 9, 2012, 12:00pm – The Discovery Center is once again seeking volunteers for this weekends Eagle Count on February 11th. No experience is needed, but volunteers are encouraged to dress warmly and bring binoculars and a watch.  Volunteers should meet at the Discovery Center located on North Shore Drive at 8:00am on February 11th.  In addition to the eagle counting, there will also be a celebration for the Bald Eagle at 11:00am, in which US Forest Service Biologists will host a free one hour educational Eagle presentation at the Discovery Center.  Attendees will learn about the Eagles’ migration and behavior habits, an overview of hazards that have affected Eagles throughout history, and how the Eagle has recovered from historical lows as an endangered species in the 1970’s.   Our Bald Eagles normally migrate out of the San Bernardino and San Jacinto Mountains in late March, heading back to summer homes in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, and Alberta, Canada. In recent years, a pair of Bald Eagles has remained at Lake Hemet and successfully produced several eaglets.

Related posts:

  1. Volunteers Needed To Count Bald Eagles
  2. Volunteers Needed For January Bald Eagle Count
  3. Learn a Snow Sport This January
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