“If You Care, Leave Them There.” Young Wildlife Should Be Left Alone

Big Bear, Ca, April 14, 2011, 4:00pm - The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) recommends that people not handle any young wild animals they see in the outdoors. The improper handling of young wildlife is a problem in California and across the nation, most commonly in the spring, when many species are caring for their offspring.  According to the Department of Fish and Game, people frequently encounter young wild animals they think need assistance or have been orphaned. However, in most cases neither  assumption is true and the animals should be left alone. In 2009, 537 fawns were turned into California rehabilitation facilities by well-meaning members of the public. Many of these fawns were healthy and should not have been disturbed.  Disease is another reason that wild animals should not be handled. Wild  animals can transmit diseases that can be contracted by humans, including rabies and tularemia, and also carry ticks, fleas and lice. The Department also reminds the public that wildlife belongs in the wild. As wildlife experts say: “If you care, leave them there.”

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Big Bear, Ca, April 14, 2011, 4:00pm - The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) recommends that people not handle any young wild animals they see in the outdoors. The improper handling of young wildlife is a problem in California and across the nation, most commonly in the spring, when many species are caring for their offspring.  According to the Department of Fish and Game, people frequently encounter young wild animals they think need assistance or have been orphaned. However, in most cases neither  assumption is true and the animals should be left alone. In 2009, 537 fawns were turned into California rehabilitation facilities by well-meaning members of the public. Many of these fawns were healthy and should not have been disturbed.  Disease is another reason that wild animals should not be handled. Wild  animals can transmit diseases that can be contracted by humans, including rabies and tularemia, and also carry ticks, fleas and lice. The Department also reminds the public that wildlife belongs in the wild. As wildlife experts say: “If you care, leave them there.”

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

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