Six American Bald Eagles Now Spotted in the Big Bear Valley, Per U.S. Forest Service Count

The eagles have landed here in the Big Bear Valley—in fact, another two were spotted in the areas surrounding Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake since the U.S. Forest Service count in December. As of this weekend’s American bald eagle census count for our area, six eagles (three adults and three juveniles) were counted by biologists with the San Bernardino National Forest and 33 volunteers in the Big Bear Valley. In the overall San Bernardino National Forest count on January 9, 14 eagles were spotted in areas that include Big Bear, Lake Arrowhead, Lake Hemet and Silverwood Lake, thanks to the contributions of over 80 volunteers; the next Saturday morning count is scheduled for February 13. Eagles tend to winter in our area between November and April, and can generally be spotted in the tallest trees around the lakeshore, or perched on the lake ice near small groups of ducks.

Adult eagles have a white head and tail, while juvenile eagles have a brown head and tail for the first 4-5 years of their life.

Adult eagles have a white head and tail, while juvenile eagles have a brown head and tail for the first 4-5 years.

The eagles have landed here in the Big Bear Valley—in fact, another two were spotted in the areas surrounding Big Bear Lake and Baldwin Lake since the U.S. Forest Service count in December. As of this weekend’s American bald eagle census count for our area, six eagles (three adults and three juveniles) were counted by biologists with the San Bernardino National Forest and 33 volunteers in the Big Bear Valley. In the overall San Bernardino National Forest count on January 9, 14 eagles were spotted in areas that include Big Bear, Lake Arrowhead, Lake Hemet and Silverwood Lake, thanks to the contributions of over 80 volunteers; the next Saturday morning count is scheduled for February 13. Eagles tend to winter in our area between November and April, and can generally be spotted in the tallest trees around the lakeshore, or perched on the lake ice near small groups of ducks.

[caption id="attachment_1073" align="alignleft" width="570" caption="Adult eagles have a white head and tail, while juvenile eagles have a brown head and tail for the first 4-5 years."]Adult eagles have a white head and tail, while juvenile eagles have a brown head and tail for the first 4-5 years of their life.[/caption]

Related posts:

  1. Six Bald Eagles Spotted in Big Bear in January; Volunteers Welcome on Forest Service’s Saturday Count
  2. Forest Service Counts Four American Bald Eagles in the Big Bear Valley
  3. Help Count Bald Eagles With The Forest Service